THOSE TO WHOM I HAVE NOTHING TO SAY

HORTUS CONCLUSUS

Conversation at the gate
On the simplicity in everything eternal
On the changing position and on the ‘rungs’
On states of consciousness and help in suffering
On the consciousness of the departed
On the sublime commitment of the helpers
On the caricature of the eternal ‘I’
Once more on truth and reality
On temporal and eternal space
On the tradition of Asiatic religion
On the mystery of the east
On the forms of religion
On assent and faith
On false images of God
On the meaning of all teaching
Where I am merely a messenger
Those to whom I have nothing to say
On the eternal salvation of the soul
On the delaying desire to ask questions
On the temporal and the eternal soul
What remains after death
On a name and a makeshift
The conclusions one should reach oneself
On gross underestimation
On the plight of pastoral workers
How the eternal is ‘natural’ to itself
To conclude and goodbye

THOSE TO WHOM I HAVE NOTHING TO SAY

 

Everything I came to say has only been said to call those concerned to their conscious awakening in the eternal light of the spirit which is their substantial primeval foundation of life and therefore the only guarantee of life in permanence. I do not want, however, to awaken those who still need sleep. I have nothing to say to them; whatever they nevertheless hear when I speak to my own, will remain mere sounds the ear of a sleeping person takes in without apprehending the sense of what he hears. They are still dreaming with open eyes, and the world of their dreams is their only conscious ‘reality’. One must let those deluded by dreams continue to sleep until they one day tire of their sleeping, – whether still in their time on earth or only after the help offered them by the earthly body is beyond their reach. ‘The night when no man can work’ is only ‘night’ to those who do not strive to use the spiritual help of their earthly bodies; only of this kind is it said that ‘no man’ is able to ‘work’ in the dark night. It is not at all easy to see through one’s dreams in the bright light of day and perceive that the dreamed reality is only ‘reality’ for the dream playing within it. It is far easier to come to this realisation when the earthly body can still offer earthly resonance to the feeling of the eternal than after the death of the body which definitely removes this possibility.
Those one must leave to dream on, since they are still far from being tired of sleeping, suspect nothing, of course, of these things and do not want to have any suspicion of what might waken them up. They feel too comfortable in their dreaming which they call their ‘wakeful thinking’ to be even capable of feeling the slightest urge within them to exchange their condition for another. In the belief that all darkness must be illuminated by the thinking of their brains, they suspect error and illusion wherever illumination is impossible for the knowledge of their dreams, because only the awakened feeling ability of the soul can apprehend the substantial light of the eternal spirit. And none so self-assured in their dreams are aware of how valuable their earthly bodies could become, if they could only use it as a temporal intensifier of feeling through which it becomes so much easier for the soul to bring the very delicate feelings of the spirit to the consciousness of the brain.
I have nothing to say to all these who are so sure of themselves; what I say is not said for them. Only when, one day, their great assurance has become suspicious to them will they be able to find their way to me, and only then will I also have ‘something to say’ to them.
I have never anything to say to those who – like voles do with roots – gnaw at all the mysteries they are not entitled to behold. They are dreaming no less with open eyes as the others, but their dreaming is the savouring of unclean greed and the furtive addiction to have power over powers which are wisely placed above and beyond them. If in their ignorant arrogance the brains of such freebooters apply all I have to say to others to themselves, those things can never belong to them. For what I have to say wants to be felt, – those who are greedily eager for hidden power, stealthily seek to find out those things of which I have said to others that they can only be felt within.
He who would truly be among those for whom I have something to say must cast the illusion far away that I am seeking to bring him ‘knowledge’ which he can add to his existing earthly knowledge and thereby lay claim to. He will only grasp what I have to say when he senses in every word only my will to awaken his soul’s ability to feel; only then will my words really ‘have something to say to him’! Everything I say wants to be felt; it is not given with the intention of offering the astuteness of the recipient an opportunity to practice its art of rational dissection. And so I have nothing to say to all those who eagerly try to accommodate what they have heard from me to something else they have heard elsewhere. For what I give will be falsified immediately if one interprets my words as though they were seeking to bear witness to some philosophical or confessional system of thought. What I say is begotten from the eternal reality of the spirit and has only become word from its feeling of itself! What I give is like clear maps which protect the traveller from losing his way. But it is of no use to ‘know’ about the way for those who want to see the land themselves. Only when they walk the way themselves will they come close to feeling what was previously concealed from them!